5–9 June 2017
Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, Denver, Colorado

NASA Aeronautics Experts Detail Programs in Progress

Posted: 9 June 2017, 3:45 p.m. EDT


Speaker:
Moderator Rich Wahls, strategic technical adviser, Advanced Air Vehicles Program, Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, NASA’s Langley Research Center; Brent Cobleigh, project manager, Flight Demonstrations and Capabilities Project, Integrated Aviation Systems Program, NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center; Peter Coen, project manager, Commercial Supersonic Technology, NASA’s Langley Research Center; Fay Collier, associate director for flight strategy, Integrated Aviation Systems Project, NASA; Jaiwon Shin, associate administrator, NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate; Ed Waggoner, director, NASA’s Integrated Aviation Systems Program

by  Duane Hyland, AIAA Communications

From exciting advances in low-boom supersonic flight to X-plane development to advanced electric propulsion systems, aeronautics programs are on track to deliver some exciting, transformative systems over the next generation, according to the panel of experts in the June 9 session “NASA Aeronautics New Aviation Horizons” at the 2017 AIAA AVIATION Forum in Denver.

Jaiwon Shin, associate administrator of NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, told the crowded session that the vision for aeronautics progress NASA debuted at the 2013 AIAA AVIATION Forum is proceeding ahead as planned.

Shin highlighted NASA’s progress in the development of advanced air vehicles, the ongoing effort to roll out integrated aviation systems and the development of transformative aeronautical concept. He identified each of these areas as “mission programs.”

“We want to work on specific and compelling technical challenges and retire them in six years,” Shin said. “That is, we have six years to solve these problems.”

Other panelists took a more in-depth look on the progress of each project.

Peter Coen, project manager for commercial supersonic technology with NASA’s Langley Research Center, said community flight studies of the first low-boom supersonic aircraft should be available by 2025.

RichWahls-JaiwonShin-June2017

Moderator Rich Wahls, strategic technical adviser, Advanced Air Vehicles Program, Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, NASA's Langley Research Center, and Jaiwon Shin, associate administrator, NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, participate in the panel discussion, "NASA Aeronautics New Aviation Horizons," June 9 at the 2017 AIAA AVIATION Forum in Denver.

Fay Collier, associate director for flight strategy for NASA’s Integrated Aviation Systems Project, reported that five NASA corporate partners have developed designs for a new subsonic demonstrator model that they plan to have ready to fly by 2026.

Brent Cobleigh, project manager for flight demonstrations and capabilities with the Integrated Aviation Systems Program at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center, examined the development of the Maxwell X-57 all-electric aircraft. He reported that testing on that aircraft has shown that “replacing internal combustion engine to electric motors increases efficiency from 28 percent to 92 percent.” Cobleigh said a second round of flight testing for the X-57 could begin in 2018.

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